sapphorlando (sapphorlando) wrote in yesfans,
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sapphorlando
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Squire with Ric

Found this image while poking around on Rickenbacker's website:





This is a 4001CS/LE. The finish colour (called 'Cream Colorglo') is unique to this signature edition, and 1000 were made. (I'm guessing this one is a very low number.)


Technical note: Rickenbacker's website doesn't provide detailed technical information on discontinued models, and other sources don't provide this specific information, but I think we can assume that although this is described as a 4001, it must be, under the finish, more like a 4003, because the original 4001 was not engineered to constantly withstand the tension of roundwound strings; a true 4001 would suffer some rate of neck torsion, and I'm sure Rickenbacker wouldn't deliberately put out a bass that they knew would fail in under stress in some proportion of cases. (Squire's original bass was a 1965 'Model 1999,' the overseas designation for the 4001S, which was a no-frills version of the 4001.) I do know that Squire's 1999 had stereo output (which I believe was necessary for the harmonsed effect he so favoured) and the CS is mono, but I don't know much more.


A typical used 4001 or 4001S in excellent condition goes for around a grand, and a 4003 can command a bit more. (Factory RDP on a new 4003 is $1640.) I found a CS/LE on eBay going for well over three grand, which goes to show what the market demand on this very rare bass is. My advice for anyone wanting to try to be like Chris Squire would be to find a good used 4003 and save a couple grand.

Remember also that vintage isn't all it's cracked up to be. These guys were making the best use of the best equipment available to them at the time (and in cases like Squire, sometimes pushing the design limitations). If he were starting today, I feel sure that he'd pick up a Cheyenne instead.
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